How to pick a right golf clubs for you

Your golfing skill level will help you figure out which clubs should be in your bag. There are certain clubs which are an ease to use for those players of all levels, but some clubs are better for just those who are of a higher skill level. 

If you’ve got the golf rules down, you’d know that you are allowed a maximum of 14 clubs. The following are good clubs to carry for different skill levels, but keep in mind that if there is a certain club that works well for you include it in your bag. The kinds of clubs you may carry really shouldn’t be just black and white, it’s the outcome that matters and should ultimately help you determine which clubs to carry with you.  

The Low Handicapper’s Bag
• Driver
• 3-wood
• 2-iron through 9-iron
• Pitching wedge
• Lob wedge
• Sand wedge
• Putter

If you are a scratch golfer, you might carry the same assortment but a gap wedge instead of the 2-iron. Of course with a higher level comes an even more specialized game. This specialization for quality players tends to focus on the short game. A number of prime players can hit a ball at a distance that does not even require them of the long iron, and so they opt for additional wedges instead of the usual 1-iron or 2-iron. The gap wedge and the lob wedge may give a good golfer even more options to play around with. 

The Mid-Handicapper’s Bag
• Driver
• 3-wood, 5-wood, 7-wood
• 4-iron through 9-iron
• Pitching wedge
• Sand wedge
• Putter

Mid-handicappers may find that hitting with a 3-wood off the tee can produce better results for them compared to a driver. They do have a better chance of taming a driver compared to a high handicapper. If you are an intermediate player who has a strong short game you may even think of including a gap wedge or lob wedge to the abovementioned assortment. But in general, mid-handicappers do well with lofted fairway woods compared to long irons. 

The High Handicapper’s Bag
• 3-wood
• 5-wood, 7-wood
• 5-iron through 9-iron
• Pitching wedge
• Putter

A lot of high handicappers struggle with a driver, even if they want to use one very much. Considering safety, high handicappers can put others in danger when using a driver due to the way they view distance as the most important or significant quality they want to attain off the tee. Most of the time, these high handicappers end up spending a large sum of money on an oversized titanium driver which usually just puts them off the fairway instead of farther down it. It’s okay to have your own driver, but don’t take it with you when you are on to the course. You can use it when you are practicing on the driving range. 

Keep note that irregardless of your particular skill level, you should utilize clubs which you feel most comfortable hitting with.